The disruption is disrupted

Sarah Perez has a great post over at Read Write Web that is a must-read for the serious student of New Media. Called “The Conversation Has Left The Blogosphere,” it takes a serious look at how new applications are making it possible for people to discuss issues, ideas and memes taken up by bloggers away from the blogs themselves. Oh no! You mean the original conversation lifters are having their conversations lifted? What’s the world coming to?

The truth of the matter is, like it or not, the conversations that once existed solely in the blogosphere have now moved on. People still comment, but in a lot of cases, those comments aren’t on found on the blog itself.

It is ironic, to say the least, that the blogosphere — the place where stories were lifted from the mainstream press for “discussion” — is now faced with the same issue that mainstreamers have been fighting for years.

Sarah’s post offers tips on how to keep up with all the dismantling, but it doesn’t offer solutions for ways to prevent it from happening. That’s because bloggers can’t stop it any more than the mainstream press could or can. We live in a world of unbundled media. Deal with it.

This will be interesting to watch.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Maybe it’s because I work at a newspaper company and watch journalists miss conversations about their content on a daily basis, but this doesn’t seem revolutionary to me. People have always had conversations about content separate from the content itself. Thankfully I’m not the only one not amazed by this idea. Terry Heaton:  It is ironic, to say the least, that the blogosphere — the place where stories were lifted from the mainstream press for “discussion” — is now faced with the same issue that mainstreamers have been fighting for years. […]

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