The Twelve Absolute Beliefs of Trump Christians

Evangelicals pray for President Trump through the laying on of hands

The postmodern exercise of deconstruction is a useful tool when trying to understand any of the various complexities of contemporary life. It’s especially useful today in the determination of why a large and polarized group of Americans — white evangelical Christians — could have put Donald Trump in office. As is often the case, the complex is merely the simple turned on its head by the self‐serving justifications of those who benefit from the complexities. By deconstructing these characteristics, the deconstructor looking for answers can ask better questions in their quest.

The relationship between President Trump and these Christians is something I understand particularly well, for I once served the cause as Executive Producer of The 700 Club with Pat Robertson. The core discovery in my book The Gospel of Self is that Trump’s election was no accident but a carefully conceived and executed long‐term strategy of the Christian Right. This knowledge is essential as we face another election involving this same man and his flock. Try as they may, the press is simply incapable of seeing what’s really taking place, because it involves the belief that these Christians get their marching orders directly from God. Arguing against their beliefs, therefore, places one in an argument against God, which is then laughingly dismissed by the faithful.

So, let’s deconstruct the grand narrative that places white evangelical Christians in a most powerful position in our politics. In order to pull this off, these twelve specific and absolute beliefs must ALL be in place:

  1. Salvation means that one’s final destination is eternity in Heaven, and demonstrative belief in Jesus as savior is the ONLY path to salvation. Period. Behavior in the here and now, therefore, must line up with what’s required to maintain that promise. However, occasional bad behavior doesn’t necessarily mean loss of salvation, because it’s all based on faith alone. This opens the door for basically any kind of behavior, for there’s always God’s promised forgiveness.
  2. The human condition defaults to corruption and requires a spiritual conversion in order to rise above it, to prosper, to live in peace with ones’ neighbors, and especially to enable a comfortable place in the afterlife. This is the why of Christ, and no one can escape it.
  3. The saving power of Jesus via the born again experience is the how of Christ, a manifestation of faith. These are “the elect,” Heaven‐bound believers who are in fellowship with one another and with God. Again, this leaves room for behavioral lapses, because this same Jesus is good for forgiveness in the end. This is often the justification for oppression and evil in the name of God.
  4. These beliefs, according to white evangelical Christian thinking, must be held between individuals and God, for Jesus functions directly in the role of high priest for our confessions. Therefore, one’s penchant for mischief doesn’t require redemption from anyone within the church, which puts the onus for participation between the believer and God Himself (yes, God is a He). This also puts into play the significance of the “personal relationship” with Jesus and, by default, the importance of the individual in God’s mind. That’s not to diminish the role of the pastor in pressing these beliefs, but church members are constantly reminded that God speaks directly to individuals. Our job is to have “ears to hear.” White evangelicals believe it’s the responsibility of the individual to “work out his own salvation,” and therefore the correct response to poverty is to teach others how to feed themselves rather than feeding them through any human institution. “If I can do it without complaining, so can they.”
  5. We must, as Martin Luther did, acknowledge that the Epistle of James is impossible to blend with evangelicalism and therefore think of it as “the Epistle of Straw.” This means we can dismiss James’ main concern that “faith without works is dead.” Either the “just shall live by faith” or not, evangelical thinking goes.
  6. The Bible is the actual Word of God (well, except for maybe James) and to argue with it, as a whole or in part, can and often does lead to eternal damnation. And, again, this is a responsibility of the individual, for no one but God has any real authority over the believer.
  7. Following Jesus is the real determinator of happiness and contentment in this life, no matter what. This allows the believer to feel justified in looking down his nose at others from even the gutter. It feeds the pride that he is actually better off than those at the top of culture’s ladders, those who don’t need God for success and happiness. After all, the Bible says “the last shall be first.” It’s another promise directly from God to believers and the source for manipulation by those higher up the pyramid of human life. The believer is supposed to be perfectly content in this life, because life in heaven afterwards is worth the suffering of the elect.
  8. We are currently living in “the end times” — Jesus return is imminent, as in the next few minutes kind of imminent — wherein Christians must use extremely good judgment to guard against false teachers who would lead the elect to destruction. In order to recognize these false teachers (having “eyes to see”), the believer must have God’s help through men who have “knowledge of the times” as determined by God’s Holy Book. These are then equipped to truly interpret God’s will in analyzing current events through the true eyes of the Word.
  9. This is evidenced largely by the return of so‐called promised lands to the Jews (which happened with the 1948 Nakba, forcibly removing the current residents, a.k.a. the Palestinians). Moreover, the real prize for Israel is Jerusalem, which is both the why and the how of looking the other way as Israel does whatever it wants to the human beings standing in the way of their promised place of privilege on the earth. Jesus, you see, is coming back via Jerusalem. Hence, nothing else matters, not really.
  10. Liberal theology is a manifestation of end times living and, therefore, should be dismissed as heresy, the devil, or the “broad road” that leads to destruction.
  11. Donald Trump is another special gift from God to the elect, much as the Biblical King Cyrus was to ancient Israel, and he was elected to restore the (evangelical) church to its rightful place atop the patriarchy of all human institutions. In this way, the (evangelical) church represents the rightful leaders of the earth and must, therefore, assume positions of power at all levels under the sun.
  12. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, one faces the likelihood of eternity in the fires of Hell, if they don’t vote and vote for the conservative candidate (who is therefore bound to act against the murdering of babies through abortion). This is a risk the white evangelical Christians aren’t prone to take.

In her brilliant October 2018 essay for Sojourners — “Getting Over The Threat Of Hell” — Author Nancy Hightower writes that Donald Trump exploited this fear in his run to the White House.

If you have never believed in hell, it’s easy to mock the idea as ludicrous, or at least very archaic. Many who may have grown up in a faith household and left might remember the fear it instilled in them…I think it’s time to suggest that the Christian focus on hell is helping to drive evangelicals into Trump’s camp, and keeps them there.

And so, we’re now beginning to see mainstream news articles that tout the rise of angry liberal Christians. CNN published an article with the headline “Buttigieg is a symbol for a rising Christian left,” which uses the mayor’s candidacy as one example of evidence that not all of Christianity is under the spell of the white evangelicals.

“©onservative provocateur Erick Erickson started attacking Buttigieg, implying that because Buttigieg is Episcopalian — a denomination known for its more progressive positions on social issues — “he might not actually understand Christianity more than superficially.”

This is a common trope among some evangelical Christians on the right, impugning other more liberal Christians as somehow less “real” or authentic in their faith.”

I must admit to a certain joy upon reading all this, because the 2020 election will put the faith of Americans to the test. It’s not nearly as exciting a story as the horserace coverage (in the minds of the press), but it’s a highly‐relevant discussion we’ve needed for a very long time. The terms “liberal” and “conservative” are labels long used by theologians to assert theological differences of opinion, and it needs to form the basis for our understanding of politics as well.

Historically, culture wars in the United States have all had a foundation in religion, and we now have a chance to move it to the front burner in terms of issues facing democracy itself. Nobody understands this better than Professor Stephen Prothero, author of Why Liberals Win The Culture Wars (Even Though They Lose Elections). Whether it was the election of 1800, the mid‐ninetieth century assault on Catholics by Protestants, the anti‐Mormon campaign, the debates during the Scopes Monkey Trial, the battle against Supreme Court decisions of the 70s and 80s, or the current battle against Muslims, Prothero argues the outcome of culture wars historically favors the progressive perspective even though they were started by conservatives.

Donald Trump is an evil man with evil intentions, for his only true “accomplishment” as President is widening the gap between the haves and the have‐nots. He placates these right wing Christians, because he knows their support will be lasting if he does, and just because he does, it does not follow that he is a “Godly President,” as some believe. The culture cannot stand this for much longer, and the discussion of faith as the dominating factor in this election badly needs to be center stage. Perhaps debates involving Buttigieg will help, for he seems not only willing but capable of speaking on behalf of his faith.

It’s true that traditionally we’ve considered a person’s religion to be a private matter and, therefore, untouchable in terms of debate. This was a part of the election of a Catholic in 1960, putting John F. Kennedy into office. Today, that position has overstayed its welcome, as Trump Christians publicly flaunt their man as God’s answer to prayer for America.

It will take directly challenging these twelve beliefs, so the discussion must involve those who think theologically but speak in plain English, and that will rule out a press that believes such discussions are not a part of its sphere of legitimate debate.

And that is to its great shame.

It’s not Donald Trump; it’s his followers!

GOD-REPUBLICANOne of the main themes of my new book, How Jesus Joined the GOP, is that the biggest threat in the current political debate is not those who lead but the angry mob that follows. Here’s an excerpt from chapter two, The Gospel of Self:

Of the many reasons given for the distrust and dislike for fundamentalism in religion, nothing makes a more compelling argument than the intolerance that such narrow thinking breeds. Ignorance and prejudice bred in the comforting broth of selfishness produce a form of narrow‐minded bigotry so pure that it baffles observers outside its pot while self‐validating the swirling vortex of falsity within. The trapped souls inside express a perplexing form of contentment that, despite evidence to the contrary, frames a contemptuous “knowing” reserved only for those who share their “inside” knowledge. Their defense against conflicting intellectual arguments is usually based on the self‐righteous position of real or imagined persecution, which allows them to ignore reality in the name of faith…

…The obvious conclusion about these intolerant people to most observers is that leaders with selfish interests easily manipulate them, which results in attacks on those leaders by non‐believers. Such a position, however, only strengthens the beliefs of the followers, for they are driven by their faith, each other, the personal and direct connection they share with the God of their understanding, an absolute conviction that they are Heaven‐bound after death, and their own sense of manifest destiny in this life. Moreover, their support of leaders isn’t top‐down, as most contemporary observers would contend; it is, rather, bottom‐up, and this means that leadership is interchangeable. Let me repeat that intolerance comes not from the leaders of the movement but rather from those followers whose lack of perspective, study, knowledge, opportunities for study or knowledge, or intelligence produces remarkable and dangerous consequences. The leaders, especially early leaders, certainly share culpability for this mess, but an open‐minded argument with such often reveals differences in the messages given and those received. The followers believe they “get it” and enter into conversations with family, friends, co‐workers, church members, and others. This will not and can not be overcome by any top‐down means. Intolerance, therefore, is the floor covering of the ground level — those who seek validation for their views and resonance with leaders who speak their language…

…As the twenty‐first century moves along, this bottom‐up conservative leadership paradigm has at its disposal a weapon so powerful that the hierarchical status quo is having great difficulty being heard above all the noise.

It’s the Internet, with its remarkable efficiency in allowing person‐to‐person communications, and a convenient conduit for the furtherance of the Gospel of Self. Human nature is on display for all in the world of the network.

It’s my belief that in the current circumstances involving the candidacy of Donald Trump, it accomplishes zero to wax on regarding his character, his history, or even his behavior, for the ears of the angry mob are closed to such. They support him, because they hear themselves in his candidacy and nothing else. Like sheep, they hear the voice of their master, but unlike sheep, that voice comes from within the flock. Max Lucado and other notable Christians have come out this week essentially labeling Mr. Trump “unChristian,” but it won’t make a difference, for, again, the ears of the angry mob can’t hear such reasoning.

Whether it’s the press or Evangelical leaders, modernist logic (and history) won’t work against what is essentially a postmodern problem. How does one manipulate those of the Great Horizontal in such a way as to GET them to see the danger of Donald Trump? One doesn’t, and that’s the real problem here. It’s too late, and besides, it must be accomplished horizontally, and that is not in the skill set of political players today and certainly not the press. The best these groups could do is ignore him, but that’s not going to happen. The louder they holler, the better they fit the beliefs that the mob has about them in the first place.

A great many people are in a panic mode, including some of my friends. “It’s the end of the Republican Party,” I’ve read. Well, maybe that wouldn’t be such a bad thing right now. Maybe it’s so run off the rails that it needs reinvention. Let the right wing have their own party, so that we can differentiate. Who really knows? That’s what I’m trying to say. We just seem hell bent on keeping things as they are despite the proof before our eyes that the public is sick of it.

So here’s my advice for all the people who are squawking about Donald Trump. Create yourself some memorable memes that reflect understanding of “their” issues and seed them throughout social media. Let somebody besides Mr. Trump speak in their language about what’s troubling them. Take them seriously.

You cannot change the bottom from the top anymore. Best to wake up to that truth today instead of tomorrow with President Trump.