Pat Robertson’s Veil

Let’s take a little journey through Pat Robertson’s mind in the wake of his prophetic proclamation of a Trump reelection, war involving Israel, peace for awhile, followed by an asteroid strike, and then the end of everything. Even for Pat, this is a stretch, and I’ve heard from friends that say “he needs to get off the air.”

As if that would ever happen.

Pat “sees” things through a complex but reliable veil, that he and his ilk are the Biblical “sons of Issachar, men with knowledge of the times.” However, that veil includes Republican Party talking points, because Pat is first a politician, secondly a television preacher of some acclaim. He feels, as an apostle for the current times, that he can interpret and proclaim by clipping together various parts of the Bible to create — as Disney used to say — the plausible impossible when it comes to commentary on current events. This was the entire basis for the work we did in the early 80s in developing a propaganda-based narrative that we alone could see and therefore “interpret and report” as a news organization. We were “TV Journalism With A Different Spirit.”

I can tell you from experience that he is being quite sincere in that this Trump/asteroid scenario is the only one that works vis-a-vis his veil. After all, he’s talking about God, his view of God orchestrating everything, so that it “makes sense” to him and his followers.

It ought to scare the crap out of Americans that a man like this has the ear of the President of the United States.

These proclamations from the mountain top were a regular feature of my daily life as Executive Producer of The 700 Club in the early and mid 80s. In 1984, for example, he looked downstream and prophesied “deep darkness and trouble” for America “towards the end of the year.” And what was happening at the end of the year? Ronald Reagan was running for reelection.

This era of evangelical messaging about the end times began in 1948 with the return of the Jews to the Holy Land through the political movement known as Zionism. Through Pat’s veil, this could mean only one thing: that God was preparing the world for the return of Jesus Christ. Hence, the relentless pounding the self-centered message of salvation to everybody and the creation of a set of evangelical rules that demanded Christians participate or run the risk of losing their salvation and be damned for eternity.

It’s a powerful manipulator of good people and not-so-good people.

So, what are we to do?

Pat was quick to point out the words of Jesus, who said in Matthew 24 that no human will ever know the date and the hour that the end comes. Pat glossed over it in acknowledging that he could be wrong. But here’s the thing. God isn’t stupid. Life knows that it has to be so in order to prevent the self-centered manipulation that would likely come out of letting anybody in on the secret.

Evangelical Christianity of the sort practiced by Pat Robertson and his clan is doing exactly that politically. Christians fearful of going to hell simply pass along what they’ve been told, because the threat against them is that they’ll miss out on all the fun associated with the Rapture and smiling at their “unbelieving” friends as they pass them by on their way to Heaven.

Thus, the message is one of well-produced superstition and unprovable proclamations, all stemming from a man who himself wanted to be President. I was at the meeting in the board room of CBN where Pat first told us he was running. He said that God had told him to run and that he would win. It was the only possible “Biblical” conclusion to what he was being “told”, right?

Once again, Pat is counting on his “gifts” to guide a narrative that makes sense to him but challenges those who still are able to think for themselves.

Christianity has its own God/man to stand between believers and a vengeful God in order to prevent his Father from destroying everything. At least that’s what we’re taught.

His name is Jesus Christ, not Pat Robertson.