Postmodern Fame

Mean Mary James, a terrific talent you’ve probably never heard of. She makes it in the new world through a deep connection with her fans.

In the mass marketing world, fame is determined by many things, but perhaps the most important is the size of the audience one can grow or the amount of money one can make in so doing. The two are inexorably connected, and this fits nicely with the processes and systems of modernism. Logically, it’s possible to create wealth by accumulating a mass audience that will directly purchase products or allow their eyes to be exposed to advertisements from third-parties. Whether it’s a stadium concert or an Instagram following, this is the historical path to fame.

It’s in this light that a recent Bloomberg story can make the claim, “‘Success’ on YouTube Still Means a Life of Poverty.”

New research out of Germany billed as among the first to review the chances of making it in the new Hollywood shows a vanishingly small number will ever break through—just like in the old Hollywood.

In fact, 96.5 percent of all of those trying to become YouTubers won’t make enough money off of advertising to crack the U.S. poverty line, according to research by Mathias Bärtl, a professor at Offenburg University of Applied Sciences in Offenburg.

Breaking into the top 3 percent of most-viewed channels could bring in advertising revenue of about $16,800 a year, Bärtl found in an analysis for Bloomberg News.

The article goes on to say that “One in 3 British children age 6 to 17 told pollsters last year that they wanted to become a full-time YouTuber. That’s three times as many as those who wanted to become a doctor or a nurse.” This is all based on the fame=wealth paradigm of mass media, and it’s a losing formula in today’s age for two reasons. One, as a business model, mass media is hanging on by a thread. Targeting has replaced it in an effort to overcome Wanamaker’s dilemma of half his marketing budget going to waste on the assumption that his customers would be a part of the crowd. Two, the web is a miracle of horizontal connectivity, and new models for the arts are being developed regularly. A big part of the problem is our addiction to formulas in the West. The whole system is corrupt and serves the few, and there simply is no process that’ll replace hard work and interaction.

I’ve written before about Kevin Kelly’s brilliant “1,000 true fans,” and that model is being exploited by entrepreneurs who sense opportunity. To all makers of content, hear this: scarcity cannot be assumed in an age when anybody can make content, and if that’s the case, then your content must be used in other ways to make money. Patreon is a brilliant website designed to help creatives make money through the support of fans – even Kelly’s “True Fans.” In this way, support for artistic endeavors is garnered without directly selling the products being created. Patreon’s software does all the heavy lifting, but smart creators (or their business managers) have the tools to work with those supporters in making their experience worthwhile. According to Wikipedia:

Patreon is a membership platform that provides business tools for creators to run a subscription content service, as well as ways for artists to build relationships and provide exclusive experiences to their subscribers, or “patrons.”

Websites like Concert Window or StageIt provide artists with a way to interact with fans while performing from anywhere, including their own living rooms. There’s a suggested “offering” for participation, and artists can provide prizes for the biggest concert donor. It’s a great way to promote anything and to please those 1,000 true fans.

People (and institutions) will always support the arts, and we have to get it out of our heads that there’s only one way to do that. The lure of Kardashianesque stardom tugs at the egos of many, but isn’t it really about living a reasonable lifestyle while using the gifts we’ve been given to share with others? So what if a second job is required for a season? The passion to share what’s within is driving change as the Great Horizontal presses onward.

Let us not despise the day of small beginnings.

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.