Nothing states the New Media case like numbers

Nothing states the New Media case like numbers
A great case can be made that culture itself is the enemy of broadcasting’s current conundrum, and the numbers make that pretty clear. Here are some quotes from an excellent resource article on the changing media landscape by Wall Street Journal writer, Martin Peers.

So much is changing so quickly that NBC’s head of research, Alan Wurtzel, predicts the period of 2003-2005 will in the future be seen as a “watershed change … the beginning of a very different era.”
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Since 1973, the median number of hours that people say they work has jumped from 41 a week to 49, according to Harris Interactive … That has mostly come out of people’s leisure time, which has dropped from 26 to 19 hours a week over the same period.
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Technologies that help consumers manage and maximize their own time are gaining popularity, including cable-TV “on-demand” services that let viewers order movies or TV shows on their own schedule rather than a network’s.
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“In 1965, 80 percent of 18- to 49-year-olds in the U.S. could be reached with three 60-second TV spots. In 2002, it required 117 prime-time commercials to produce the same result,” (according to) Procter & Gamble’s global marketing officer, Jim Stengel.
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“This is not about the death of TV. It’s about the slow death of the 30-second commercial,” says Rishad Tobaccowala, an executive vice president in Starcom Mediavest Group’s media planning and buying group.
As earlier reported, nearly one-third of prime time network television is now taken by commercials, so is it any wonder people are looking for alternatives? I don’t think so.

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