Nashville is Talking” to close

So my old friend Nashville is Talking is closing down. You can read about it here, here, and here.

This is a tough one for me personally. That site is a part of my life, an innovation in local media that accomplished much in teaching us about aggregating and curating a local blogosphere. However, the site didn’t meet the economic needs of its owners, Young Broadcasting, who were going through a severe financial season. In that way, what happened to it is a sad reminder that innovations by companies with serious bottom line issues can’t compete with those funded by venture capital.

A part of me dies with NiT, but here are a couple of thoughts.

In today’s fire hose of content known as the Web, we need curators more than ever. The value proposition of Nashville is Talking always was it was one RSS feed that could give you insight into 400. Who will do that tomorrow (or today, for that matter)?

It’s ironic I’m at a conference in New York with local media companies who are discussing ways to make money locally via the Web, and friendship with local bloggers seems to be high on everybody’s agenda. I disagree with those who say we’ve moved past blogging. Broadcasters tend to understand Twitter and Facebook, because they can function very much in a broadcast mode. The problem with NiT was that we didn’t have time to create the ad network that would have sustained it, and that’s simply a matter of timing. The idea was ahead of the ability to pull it off.

I’m really sad to see it go. Yesterday, I was talking with another company in a bigger market about building such a curator/aggregator in his city. So the concept is still very much of interest to people who wish to help grow the personal media revolution locally. That’s a good bet for relevancy tomorrow.

And who knows if somebody in Nashville won’t acquire the domain and resurrect the original model. For that reason, I’m disinclined to say R.I.P.

Comments

  1. I love that you’re disinclined to say R.I.P. As I just commented over at Brittney’s, I’d love nothing better than to see it return somehow mostly as it was — or a reasonable facsimile under someone else as talented at bringing a community together as Brittney was. The start of my day has never been the same since she left NiT, and there have many been long periods since when it’s been impossible for me to keep up and read blogs daily (or even weekly) as I would have liked. If NiT had still existed as it was in Brittney’s day, I’d have never fallen out of the loop or been as disconnected as I mostly am these days.

    I’d love to see someone resurrect the original model (or close). Blogging isn’t dead — especially around these parts down here — there just hasn’t been any glue to hold the community together like NiT was able to do back in those days.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Heaton was the consultant on the project. He writes at his PoMo Blog: That site is a part of my life, an innovation in local media that accomplished much in teaching us […]

  2. […] Heaton was the consultant on the project. He writes at his PoMo Blog: That site is a part of my life, an innovation in local media that accomplished much in teaching us […]

  3. […] Heaton was the consultant on the project. He writes at his PoMo Blog: That site is a part of my life, an innovation in local media that accomplished much in teaching us […]

  4. […] And linking local bloggers together is a viable concept, just as it was when Mike Sechrist and I tried it in 2004 with Nashville is Talking. […]

Add Comment Register



Speak Your Mind

*