Farewell, Allie

I drove to Lawrenceburg, Tennessee during my trip to Nashville, so that I could visit Alicia’s grave and say my goodbyes. My grief counselor told me that most people “move on” after the death of a spouse, but not nearly as many “let go.” He encouraged me to do so, because people who don’t are never really able to enjoy life again. “She’s dead, Terry,” he said to me, “but you’re not. You honor her by living life to its fullest.”

So I wrote her a nice poem and read it to her. Here are the last few lines:

I let you go now, into the mist of yesterday.
Yet the door to your room in my heart will never lock,
And if perchance your solace I need, you’ll find me there.
For your love will always strengthen me.
Her headstone is beautiful. I made the design, but it was carved by the local stonecutters. The dragonfly was the symbol of my/our company and the subject of my last manuscript, Princess of the Pond. She loved the symbol, because dragonflies are changelings; they live half their lives underwater and the rest in the sky. I’ve always thought it’s symbolic of the human experience as well, and it represents where she currently resides. The Bible verse is a portion of Psalms 127:2. We said it to each other every night, and it was the last thing she ever said to me.

Aloha oe, myAllie. Aloha oe.

Comments

  1. Steve Safran says

    God bless, Terry. And God bless your beautiful Allie.

  2. The design is stunning. It’s something I’ve never seen a tombstone be before — edifying. It gives a feeling of hope.

  3. THAT’S A BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE TERRY FOR A BEAUTIFUL LADY
    SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN PLEASED
    GOD BLESS YOU
    GOOD LUCK IN DALLAS

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