Free Range Content Consumption

flytvsmHere is the latest in my ongoing series of essays, Local Media in a Postmodern World.

Free Range Content

Facebook’s wish to put media content inside its own application is potentially self-destructive to those providing the content. Moreover, for Facebook, it smacks of the days of AOL. All of this would be irrelevant, if media could bring itself to release its content into the wild of the Net, but that appears more and more to be an impossible task.

To media companies, their competition is and always has been other media, which is an absurd proposition online. When a TV station, for example, behaves online only as it does in the linear world, it has already lost in the battle for relevance.

Our poor, poor ruffled feathers

angrytsmHere is the latest in my ongoing series of essays, Local Media in a Postmodern World. This one is personal, and I hope you understand.

Our Poor, Poor Ruffled Feathers

I’ve been stung by my use of the word “ignorant” in my writing over the years and once again recently. My intentions are not to insult, but that’s the way I come off to some. However, my only desire is to share knowledge, and at least part of that process is the ability to understand, be taught, or “receive.” I apologize for the personal umbrage I’ve caused, but I’m pleading for a little more from my readers. Please hear me out.

Deconstructing Pirates

Black Sails 2 2015Here is the latest in my ongoing series of essays, Local Media in a Postmodern World. This one examines closely the postmodern practice of historical deconstruction and why it’s so important for us today.

Deconstructing Pirates: Why Black Sails is More Than a TV Series

The Starz TV series “Black Sails” is the ongoing and very human story of pirates in the early 18th Century. The series’ creator “deconstructed” the history of pirates in order to come up with the interlocking stories, and this reveals much about why history cannot be completely trusted to undergird contemporary beliefs.

ESSAY: The Net Redefines “Local”

Here is the latest in my ongoing series of essays, “Local Media in a Postmodern World:”

The Net Redefines “Local”

New research by Pew reveals insight about TV News and the difference between small markets and big markets. In academic circles, this is defined as “provincial” versus “cosmopolitan” coverage. The data got me to thinking about media and proximity and how geography is used to define the word “local” in local media. But the Internet has changed or at least modified that word, which opens up windows of opportunity never before available to those who view their audience through the lens of DMAs. Please join me on this fascinating journey of discovery.

The People ARE in Charge!

picardfacepalmOpinions from various corners of the television industry, when placed together, can often open a reader’s eyes to deeper truths about events challenging the broadcast and cable status quo. This is why I try to keep my eyes open for clues that light the path to tomorrow during my reading and study time. Today, I want to provide you with a classic example of this.

First, let’s go back to November of last year and a Mediapost article about the future of television. TV: Evolution or Revolution by Charlene Weisler is a nice overview, although it lacks anything really “new” or profound about what lies ahead. There is a quote in this article, however, that I find utterly fascinating. It comes from Joan Gillman, COO of Time Warner Cable Media. This is no foot soldier making this statement on behalf of TWC; this is a top, top-level executive:

“We have trained the consumers to consume media whenever and wherever they want, but what hasn’t caught up is the measurement.”

So basically, TWC believes that the people’s demand to explore media “whenever and wherever they want” was actually implanted in them by the cable giant. Really? This is pure poppycock and anybody with half a brain who’s been paying attention knows it. The people have FORCED media companies into providing them with the content THEY want when and where they want it. It takes a very special kind of arrogance to make the statement “we trained the consumers” when, in fact, the very opposite is true.

This is important, folks, because if you’re of a mind to be influenced by what Ms. Gillman says, you’re going to make mistakes, serious mistakes on the path ahead. For crying out loud, how can anyone so highly placed — at Time Warner Cable, of all places — not acknowledge the revolution of the people brought about by technological disruptions? Wow. It blows my mind.

Now let’s move over to an article from The Street Friday about, well, the future of television. Why Streaming Old Shows Could Backfire on Television Networks by Leon Lazaroff is a reaction piece to the Thursday announcement by Les Moonves in which “his network had signed a deal to license its super-show CSI to a U.S.-subscription-based video-on-demand service, known in the industry as SVOD.” The article contains this remarkable response by Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger from an investor note:

“We believe networks need to wean themselves off of SVOD (subscription video on demand) licensing, which we believe is the primary driver of the demise of ad-supported video consumption.”

Wait. What?

Here’s another seemingly intelligent human being (I mean the guy advises people on how to invest their MO-NEY) whose head is actually stuck up his backside. Really, Mr. Juenger? Get onboard the Cluetrain, for crying out loud.

What would happen if the networks actually TOOK this advice? Once again, anybody paying any attention can easily come to the correct answer: Bye-bye networks. Hello? The people are in charge today, as Jay Rosen first tagged them, “The people formerly known as the audience.” This moron actually thinks that people would climb back into the casket of viewing on somebody else’s schedule complete with commercials to pad the ride.

OMG!

So here’s the point. Both of these quotes point to a self-deluded ignorance that has gone to seed. It’s rampant out there, folks! This is exactly why the industry is doomed to collapse under the weight of such ill-informed and ignorant leadership.

Repeat after me: The. People. Are. In. Charge! We need to be meeting their needs and not our own, for in pressing our needs first, we are guaranteeing ourselves an empty chair at tomorrow’s table.

The Right Way to do Customer Service

I received this 2 days after contacting Vanguard

I received this 2 days after contacting Vanguard

It’s been many years since the “Dell Hell” episode in the life of Jeff Jarvis, and customer service across the country continues to have its ups and mostly downs. In my limited experience, however, I sense that companies are really trying to use technology to assist with the heavy lifting today, although we still have a very long way to go (will somebody please invent a replacement for telephone answering technology?).

I want to share with you today a remarkable experience I had last Wednesday with Vanguard USA, a manufacturing company that specializes in photo, video, and hunting accessories. In my case, I was looking for a quick release shoe (see photo) for Alicia’s old tripod, made by Vanguard under the Forceguard brand. My search for this was like looking for the proverbial needle in the haystack, and I ended up on Vanguard’s website. They offered 10 or so quick shoes, but the dimensions weren’t offered, so I was stuck. On their contact page, right under their phone number, is an email address. At first, I was taken aback. I mean who knew? I clicked on it, opening my Outlook and presenting me with a simple method of contact.

Below is the entire email chain. Note especially the time stamps. Every company in America (hell, the whole world) could learn from this, and I am happy to present it here for you:

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 12:28pm

To Whom It May Concern:

I’m in need of a quick release plate for an older Forceguard (Vanguard) tripod (MG5-OS). The opening for the plate clasp is 1 1/2″ x 1 3/4”. Do any of your QS products (except #40) fit that criteria? You don’t give the dimensions.

Sorry, but I really NEED this.

Thanks,

Terry

Terry Heaton
7435 S Catawba Circle NW
Madison, AL 35757

12:59pm

Terry–

Thank you for your email and your interest in our products.

You need the QS-36. You can purchase it from our website at www.vanguardworld.com

We thank you for choosing VANGUARD and we hope to keep you as a satisfied customer.

Michelle Rainbolt
Repair Technician
Vanguard USA Inc

1:22pm

Your are amazing! Thanks.

Terry Heaton

1:27pm

I ordered the part, Michelle. Too bad I can’t request overnight shipping. Seems like something’s missing in your ordering process. I need that sucker and was willing to pay what’s necessary to get it. Boo-hoo.

Terry Heaton

2:01pm

Terry–

Call me here at the Service Center 800–875-3322 x120 and I will see what I can do…

Michelle Rainbolt

2:39pm

Terry–

It will be going out today 2nd day air. Tracking # is as follows: 1zew00150265006143

Michelle Rainbolt

3:03pm

You are SUCH a blessing. Can you give me name/email of your supervisor? I’m so often underwhelmed with anybody’s “customer service,” that I’m really trying to come to grips with the opposite. Love to get you a raise.

Terry Heaton

Thursday, February 5, 2015 12:48pm
Email to Michelle’s supervisor:

Dear Lynn,

I had just a wonderful customer service experience with a staff member of yours yesterday. I’ve got to say that in all my years of contact with various “customer service” units, I’ve really never had one quite so positive as I had yesterday with Michelle Rainbolt. You know, everybody has horror stories, and I always dread contacting companies, because it’s just so often useless. Just the fact that your company provides an email address online that is actually watched is remarkable, and I appreciate it so much. I sent my need (a little Quick Shoe for an old tripod), and Michelle got back to me within the hour to give me the information I needed. Unbelievable! I then went to your website and made the purchase. Unfortunately, speedy delivery was not an option, so I wrote Michelle back to thank her and tell her I wished I had the option of 1 or 2 day delivery. She got back to me immediately and actually gave me her direct line. So I called and spent 5 minutes on the phone with her, where she was able to arrange 2nd day delivery for me. I’ll now have my part tomorrow, and I am one truly HAPPY customer.

Give Michelle a raise, pat yourself on the back, and go tell your CEO that I said he runs a terrific company.

Thank you so much,

Terry

1:24pm

Terry,

Thank you so much for the kind words for Michelle.
I have shared your email with the whole company, because you are correct too often we only hear the bad.

Thanks again.

Best Regards,

Lynn A. Slagle