A few reflections from Vegas

Only in Vegas to ATM machines offer a “Quick $100” as opposed to the standard “Quick $20.”

Casinos don’t give you a coffee-maker in your room, nor do they offer cable movies. That’s because they don’t want you in your room.

Pre-boarding on Southwest Airlines is a scam. I was first in the A line and waited 2 hours only to find the exit aisle seat I wanted occupied by a guy with a hearing problem. This apparently qualifies him for pre-boarding. Bullshit. I think I’ve just developed a hearing problem.

I’m really sick of the “just chatter” discussion as regards the blogosphere. This came up in the BEA session on reinventing TV. I got angry, and I know better. But geez, people. Can’t we move it to the next level already?

Vin Crosbie had the best line at the BEA panel. “They’re dismantling broadcasting next door.” (The BEA met after the NAB had closed.)

I heard a panelist at another panel say, “Young people don’t get their news from the Internet.” What planet is this guy from? This is the kind of unsubstantiated crap that allows people to dismiss reality.

The Broadcast Education Association (BEA) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. As I said during the panel, the organization needs a new name. Broadcasting is history, so why are we educating people as though it isn’t?

Four people on a one-hour panel is too many. Nobody ever does just 10 minutes on a presentation, so there’s precious little time left over for questions.

Poynter’s Al Tompkins showed a couple of stories where truth was bent through production techniques. Nice, Al. This is part of our effort to entertain our audiences (and ourselves). Al was right on target in saying viewers see through this and call it what it really is — manipulation.

Somebody actually said, “I believe people want news that’s objective.” Sorry, but there isn’t any such thing, so how can people want it? Fairness, perhaps, but not objectivity.

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